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11/9/01 Celebration of those who died

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Actually its the anniversary tomorrow, i won't observe a silence, shit happens sometimes, forgive/fade slowly into memories

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Guest Steven Dedalus

If you won't be observing a silence, and 'shit happens', why did you feel the need to advertise your lack of interest?

Is it just because you're trying to be a provocative cob nobbler? Is that it, eh?

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Although I respect the fact if there was a silence, I can bet you anything that USA won't be having a silence for the Tsunami that happened 2 years ago.

My point is that there seems to be expectations for us to have a silence for a tragedy in America yet nothing of the sort for another country.

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Although I respect the fact if there was a silence, I can bet you anything that USA won't be having a silence for the Tsunami that happened 2 years ago.

My point is that there seems to be expectations for us to have a silence for a tragedy in America yet nothing of the sort for another country.

Aye but Camie, what you are forgetting is that most of the people who died in the tsunami were poor brown people. Rich white folk dying is obviously a much greater loss. Tsk.

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Guest Steven Dedalus
Although I respect the fact if there was a silence, I can bet you anything that USA won't be having a silence for the Tsunami that happened 2 years ago.

My point is that there seems to be expectations for us to have a silence for a tragedy in America yet nothing of the sort for another country.

Aye, but surely that promotes a situation where we are stuck going, "Well, we should have silence for this 'tragedy' and not this one because the first one was more 'tragic' and therefore deserves our attention."

I think the whole concept of a silence is more important than actually sitting in silence, as it's simply a device to force us to remember.

And for the Stripeys of the world, I don't think it's about even questioning the motives behind it or weighing up the political points, it's more important in this case just to remember. In terms of assesing the implications, we can debate that endlessly, and every day, but I do think it's important to remember these things. Living in Northern Ireland, I know what a burden history can be, but I still think it's of paramount importance to remember these occasions when the world changes.

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I still think it's of paramount importance to remember these occasions when the world changes.

We're only asked to remember when their world changes, we're not asked to remember when they changed the world of millions of innocent people in south america, the middle east and central asia over the last century. They managed to "remember" the anniversary of nagasaki and hiroshima this year by having hopeful presidential candidates trying to outdo each other in the "i wont rule out nuking pakistan" stakes. The hipocrisy is just too sickening, so I say fuck em and their mawkish "never forget" bullshit.

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We're only asked to remember when their world changes, we're not asked to remember when they changed the world of millions of innocent people in south america, the middle east and central asia over the last century. They managed to "remember" the anniversary of nagasaki and hiroshima this year by having hopeful presidential candidates trying to outdo each other in the "i wont rule out nuking pakistan" stakes. The hipocrisy is just too sickening, so I say fuck em and their mawkish "never forget" bullshit.

I think you'll find the countries involved honor their own dead on marked days.

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Guest Steven Dedalus
We're only asked to remember when their world changes, we're not asked to remember when they changed the world of millions of innocent people in south america, the middle east and central asia over the last century. They managed to "remember" the anniversary of nagasaki and hiroshima this year by having hopeful presidential candidates trying to outdo each other in the "i wont rule out nuking pakistan" stakes. The hipocrisy is just too sickening, so I say fuck em and their mawkish "never forget" bullshit.

Aye, I know what yer saying, but I'm not bringing any political stance into it.

What I'm talking about is more to do with how for a lot of us, whether we were directly affected or not, the world turned upside down when that happend, because we never thought something like that could ever happen, and it got to a lot of people, myself included, in a way that they would have never thought possible.

I vividly remember that night, just stressed and unable to sleep, holding my girlfriend because I got too carried away with it and suspected that the big red button would be pressed. That's the kind of thing I think the silence represents; by never forgetting, it will never go away, and we can never just sweep it under the carpet and forget about it.

That article you posted is pretty good, and whilst I don't particluarly agree with it, I can appreciate the points it's making. One of my reactions to the whole event was the hypocrasy which the American Government showed in their war against terrorism, whilst simultaneously donating money to the IRA to continue blowing people up over here (I'm simplifying the issue considerably here just to illustrate the point).

But like I say, it's not something that I want to forget, and I do think it is one of the defining moments of our generation.

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Actually, there are yearly silences for the people who died in the tsunami, and given that Americans were among the dead I'd imagine there's a fair amount of their countrymen who observe it. It was certainly well observed in churches and sporting events in this country last year, if I recall correctly.

I took part in a two minute silence for the Tsunami victims soon after it happened. It was during a work meeting and i made a bit of a twat of myself by complaining that I thought it was over the top and stuff like that.

What I meant though wasn't that i didn't feel sympathy for the people affected, but that people should be able to decide for themselves which disasters they feel are worth commemorating and do it in their own time, not be dictated to as to which warrant commemoration and which don't. The only valid scale of how important each death or disaster is is how an individual feels about it - the most pertinent recent example of this probably being Diana Spencer where the whole country seemed to be expected to shut down.

To then add a hierarchy of different lengths of silence is just plain ludicrous to me.

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I don't really understand the concept of silences anyway, for anything other than Remembrance Day. Obviously in that case there is a point, namely that we cannot be allowed to forget the sacrifice of those that died in World Wars. This reinforces the importance of why they died and should ensure that it doesn't happen again. There is a purpose to remembering.

But why do we need to remember those who died for other reasons eg a natural disaster? There was no reason for their deaths, whether it happens again or not is beyond our control so why is there a need to be forced to remember? There is no purpose to remembering.

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I don't really understand the concept of silences anyway, for anything other than Remembrance Day. Obviously in that case there is a point, namely that we cannot be allowed to forget the sacrifice of those that died in World Wars. This reinforces the importance of why they died and should ensure that it doesn't happen again. There is a purpose to remembering.

But why do we need to remember those who died for other reasons eg a natural disaster? There was no reason for their deaths, whether it happens again or not is beyond our control so why is there a need to be forced to remember? There is no purpose to remembering.

lets have a 'noise' instead of a silence. thrash your respective instrument for 2 minutes.

this year is the first year someone had to remind me of the significance of the date today. partly because americans get the date wrong about 98% of the time. the 1st of january they get right.

it wasnt on the fucking 9th of november!

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Should the title of this thread not be changed? Seems a little insensitive.

Celebration of the life would be more appropriate because it's not like we're celebrating they're dead.

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Here's an interesting article I came across this afternoon, which highlights the importance of the events of 11/09/01, and their regular invocation, to the american regime's ability to continue to prosecute it's violent and illegal geopolitical agenda.

TNR Online | Death Grip (1 of 2) (print)

"From a terror management perspective," they wrote, "the United States' electorate was exposed to a wide-ranging multidimensional mortality salience induction."

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i take it the terrorists aren't included in this 'celebration of those who died'????

we do seem a bit obsessed with one minute silences/noises and anniversaries.

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