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World's Greatest Record/CD collection on sale on ebay.


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I dunno, the American college-rock scene (and later, grunge), the birth of indie over here, the formative years of hip-hop, not to mention all the groundbreaking dance stuff that was coming out as well as quite an amount of perfectly decent pop music (OK, yes, for every Michael Jackson there was at least five Brother Beyonds, but anyway). The 80's were great in many respects. Not a patch on the 60's, though...

That collection is one of the greatest things I've ever seen. Makes my 6000 or so CDs look puny.

Hmm, I see where you're coming from, but I think the ratio of shite to good music was probably at its highest in the 80's. I agree with you that American college rock was kicking off, as was dance music and hip hop, but the amount of corporate dross that was being released caused the direct response of the aforementioned genres.

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Hmm, I see where you're coming from, but I think the ratio of shite to good music was probably at its highest in the 80's. I agree with you that American college rock was kicking off, as was dance music and hip hop, but the amount of corporate dross that was being released caused the direct response of the aforementioned genres.

Surely the chances of a record collector having original REM 7"s or whatever are higher than a Tina Turner CD though? I mean I don't know anyone who collects Records/CDs just now and goes out to snap up the Amy Winehouse album for future reference.

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Surely the chances of a record collector having original REM 7"s or whatever are higher than a Tina Turner CD though? I mean I don't know anyone who collects Records/CDs just now and goes out to snap up the Amy Winehouse album for future reference.

That is a very good point. This collection however, seems so unusual due to the volume of LP's, 7"s, CD's etc... that is has. Wasn't John Peel's record collection around 30,000? This one is 100 times that, so there must be a few anomalies like Pat Benetar or Ugly Kid Joe in there.

I don't have space in my flat to buy it anyway...

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That is a very good point. This collection however, seems so unusual due to the volume of LP's, 7"s, CD's etc... that is has. Wasn't John Peel's record collection around 30,000? This one is 100 times that, so there must be a few anomalies like Pat Benetar or Ugly Kid Joe in there.

I don't have space in my flat to buy it anyway...

ha, you should ask your 1864 in art guitar partner about ugly kid joe :p

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Guest Steven Dedalus

An old friend of mine reccomended that I buy 'Sandwhich' by Ugly Kid Joe, claiming it was a brilliant single (I was young, and had not heard it.)

WORST MISTAKE EVER.

I took it to a second hand shop to give it to them for free, just to get rid of it, and they refused to take it.

Lesson learned.

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An old friend of mine reccomended that I buy 'Sandwhich' by Ugly Kid Joe, claiming it was a brilliant single (I was young, and had not heard it.)

WORST MISTAKE EVER.

I took it to a second hand shop to give it to them for free, just to get rid of it, and they refused to take it.

Lesson learned.

She was a good witch, she was a bad witch, but all I really wanted was a motherfucking sandwhich.

Not their greatest moment it has to be said.

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Guest Steven Dedalus
She was a good witch, she was a bad witch, but all I really wanted was a motherfucking sandwhich.

Not their greatest moment it has to be said.

Yer damn right!

Although, the single sleeve looked like a tasty sandwhich, so I was able to take some consolation in that...

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I'm finding increasingly that I am beginning to really enjoy some music from the 80s which I used to laugh at. It wasn't all bad in the 80s, look at The Cure, Depeche Mode, Duran Duran, The Smiths, early Madonna, Beastie Boys, David Bowie, New Order etc. Some of the dark synth-y stuff from back then sounds ace now. I think in years to come people are going to look back on music from the 80s and go "you know what, it was actually pretty damn good". Of course there was generic pop shite which is to be largely ignored, but you get that in every decade. When people talk about 90s music it's always stuff like Oasis, Blur, Happy Mondays, Nirvana etc that gets brought up, not shit like 911 and Boyzone. Ignore the Jason Donovans and the Rick Astleys and there was some fucking great music made in the 80s.

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Guest Steven Dedalus

Hmm...allow me to put forward a little hypothesis I've been working on for quite some time.

THE EIGHTIES WERE EASILY THE EQUAL OF THE SIXTIES, IN MUSICAL TERMS.

By Steven Dedalus.

There is a temptation to view the 80s as a musical wasteland, bereft of all that is good and great. Bands such as Spandau Ballet and Kajagoogoo ruled the airwaves, and 'good' music was lying dormant, waiting for the explosion of Madchester and Grunge in the early 90s.

However I don't think this makes any sense at all. To say that the 80s was 'full of bad music' is as valid as pointing out that the 60s was full of terrible music as well, ie. Lulu, Englebert Humperdink, The New Seekers, Gerry and the Pacemakers, etc.

As with any decade, we must take the rough with the smooth and firstly acknowledge that there is a good side to music in any particular time period, and a bad side. However, to label the 80s as the halcyon days of bad music, is to ignore some of the most progressive and incredible music ever made.

Thus - for my generation, the 80s was our 60s.

To explain: the 60s is noted for the genuinely exploratory and inventive music made by groups such as the Beatles and the ROlling Stones, and for the leaps in songwriting by artists such as Bob Dylan. The great strides in musical development taken in during the 60s resulted in the notion of 'popular music' as we know it, and we have arguably been living in it's shadow ever since.

Now, all this would be true if it was not for the sociological impact left by punk. The massive change brought about by punk allowed musicians to re-assess their roles, and start from scratch. If the key even of the 60s was Beatlemania and the beat boom, then surely the next major explosion of creativity was the immediate period after punk.

Bands such as Wire, the Cure, Gang of FOur, Black Flag, the MInutemen, Sonic Youth, Mudhoney, Echo and the Bunnymen, REM, the Replacements, he Meat Puppets, and many, many more, began to realise that they could do their own thing, and began making albums that have come to define what 'alternative' music is.

Taking this theory a little further, one can view the 70s as the hangover of the 60s (in the sense that a degree of musical conservatism settled, and many musicians opted to refine their craft, rather than pursue new visions as the had done during the 60s) and it follows that one can view the 90s as the hangover of the 80s, with historical revisionism becoming the overriding aesthetic of the decade, and post modernism settling upon the musical landscape like the fallout from the atom bomb of creativity from the 80s.

Ho hum.

I'm REALLY bored at work.

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Hmm...allow me to put forward a little hypothesis I've been working on for quite some time.

THE EIGHTIES WERE EASILY THE EQUAL OF THE SIXTIES, IN MUSICAL TERMS.

By Steven Dedalus.

There is a temptation to view the 80s as a musical wasteland, bereft of all that is good and great. Bands such as Spandau Ballet and Kajagoogoo ruled the airwaves, and 'good' music was lying dormant, waiting for the explosion of Madchester and Grunge in the early 90s.

However I don't think this makes any sense at all. To say that the 80s was 'full of bad music' is as valid as pointing out that the 60s was full of terrible music as well, ie. Lulu, Englebert Humperdink, The New Seekers, Gerry and the Pacemakers, etc.

As with any decade, we must take the rough with the smooth and firstly acknowledge that there is a good side to music in any particular time period, and a bad side. However, to label the 80s as the halcyon days of bad music, is to ignore some of the most progressive and incredible music ever made.

Thus - for my generation, the 80s was our 60s.

To explain: the 60s is noted for the genuinely exploratory and inventive music made by groups such as the Beatles and the ROlling Stones, and for the leaps in songwriting by artists such as Bob Dylan. The great strides in musical development taken in during the 60s resulted in the notion of 'popular music' as we know it, and we have arguably been living in it's shadow ever since.

Now, all this would be true if it was not for the sociological impact left by punk. The massive change brought about by punk allowed musicians to re-assess their roles, and start from scratch. If the key even of the 60s was Beatlemania and the beat boom, then surely the next major explosion of creativity was the immediate period after punk.

Bands such as Wire, the Cure, Gang of FOur, Black Flag, the MInutemen, Sonic Youth, Mudhoney, Echo and the Bunnymen, REM, the Replacements, he Meat Puppets, and many, many more, began to realise that they could do their own thing, and began making albums that have come to define what 'alternative' music is.

Taking this theory a little further, one can view the 70s as the hangover of the 60s (in the sense that a degree of musical conservatism settled, and many musicians opted to refine their craft, rather than pursue new visions as the had done during the 60s) and it follows that one can view the 90s as the hangover of the 80s, with historical revisionism becoming the overriding aesthetic of the decade, and post modernism settling upon the musical landscape like the fallout from the atom bomb of creativity from the 80s.

Ho hum.

I'm REALLY bored at work.

That's pretty much what I said. But longer.

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Guest Steven Dedalus

Frankly, I'm not doing anyone's job at the moment, least of all my own....

Slow day in the office, truth be told.

slow enough that I actually reccomended we do this album collection thing on tonight's programme...

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I think every decade has had its share of dross and brilliance.....although the real treasures often have to be seeked out on wee labels etc

I was watching Ashes to ashes last night (videoed th first 2 episodes), and was singing merrily along to Madness, the Stranglers, Dexys etc when all of a sudden the Pop Group became central to the story line....:up::up::up:

Also..I already have the perfect (for me) record collection

(although I'd still like to add that Bridget St John picture sleeve 7" ep of 'Fly High' that I missed when it came out).

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