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Linux music studio (ATTN. SPELLCHECKER!!)

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Hi,

Just been looking at Linux in a new light after my first teaching placement. Looks pretty neat. I remember Spellchecker mentioning he'd spent most of this life (and perhaps some of his previous ones too) setting up his PC as a Linux music studio.

Any tips where to start AND is it feasible to config it as a LiveCD (or Boot CD)?

Cheers

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you can get live CDs, however you typically can't save anything you do unless you have some other storage, e.g. an external hard drive or network storage. there are some multimedia specific linux distributions, notably demudi and agnula, though they aren't always that up to date, and the linux audio development area moves very, very quickly.

a better solution is to dual boot your PC, i.e. share your hard drive with both windows and linux. that's what i used to do; just means you can use linux when you want, and windows when you want.

getting started can be a bit difficult, especially if you are new to linux. having a good sound card with low latency ability is a benefit, but not required. what soundcard do you have? i seem to remember you were about to buy (or had just bought) a new PC last time we spoke.

if you want a demonstration, feel free to drop by and you can decide for yourself if it will be of use to you.

main applications:

HDR/multi tracker: ardour (like ACiD/cubase/logic)

sequencers: rosegarden, muse (like cubase/reason)

drum machines: hydrogen (like fruityloops i guess and/or reason)

synths: zynaddsubfx, amsynth, qsynth/fluidsynth (like reason's NN-XT sampler/subtraktor synth)

wave editors: rezound, audacity (like soundforge)

there's loads more, but they are the ones that i use everyday.

hope that helps

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You sir are a god. I use linux all the time but have to switch over to my windows drive to use cubase and reason and the like. But I'd much rather get linux kitted out for recording. I didn't even know there were options out there. Thanks very much.

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I like the look of Ardour...although can I get Antares Auto Tune running in linux?! :D

if it's a VST, yes... (and if you have a copy... mumble mumble...). I run amplitube in ardour with no problems.

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Here's another question - you say there are live CDs - got a link? Would be cool to show a class or two what can be done in Linux in my next teaching placement....

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I'm a bit hesitant to try it out as I need to flash the firmware on my soundcard to get it running in Linux, not too keen on that (if it ain't broke don't fix it) I'll see how it copes with a laptops internal sound card though and post some results here....

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i use my dell laptop for live audio work as well, using its cheapy onboard sound chip. it works ok, but obviously the latencies are a lot higher than on my delta 66. i can still happily run all the same applications though.

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I had a few problems running linux with the terratec 24/96, but with all the hassle and me upgrading my comp during the year, i think i choose windows running cubase and reason just for conveinance. I have a dual boot system and have been using redhat for years and I love it, but for me you cant beat windows for convenience. Linux suffers from driver issues, the hardware companys make drivers for certain distros and certain products and the operating system its-self is always in constant development. Windows on the other hand is different, it comes out every couple of years all ready to use and backward capable with all the hardware you've been using. I would'nt think for a moment upgrading the soundcard or video would be easy as pie, because sometime's you can end up with a mess, with the saying "Its easier to re-install than to re-configure" going through you mind. Using linux friendly componants is you best way for success. Do you know how much hassle i had to go through to get linux to reconise my Zoom adsl modem and use PPPoA

mike

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yeah i know what you are saying, for the last five years i've always bought hardware with linux in mind. i think you over estimate the hardware problem though, most decent soundcards have pretty good drivers with latency timings matching asio drivers.

if you are doing audio work on linux, then you should be using ALSA sound stuff, not OSS, which is probably where half of your woes lie if you are still using redhat (as supposed to fedora core releases). check out planet ccrma for redhat/FC tailored RPM releases. makes things a lot easier.

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i am using gentoo linux, on both my desktop and my laptop.

desktop is an athlon 1800xp with 512mb ram, 2x120gb disks, m-audio delta 66 sound card with breakout box, nvidia geforce2 mx400 graphics.

laptop is a dell latitude c600 with a 1ghz pentium III and 512mb ram.

my laptop tends to trail behind the desktop in terms of software, as i want it to be as stable as possible for live stuff.

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