Jump to content
aberdeen-music
Gladstone

The Running Thread

Recommended Posts

So, not sure if many others are into running as a hobby / competitive sport on here?

 

I know Chris is a running club and has been running for a few years, anyone else?

 

Thought it might be good to share some training tips / stories / goals etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll go first...

 

Brief(ish) running history:

 

I was running sporadically for years as a back up to football training / fitness (as in going out for a run now and again, sometimes once a week for a while, but never with any structure or with any clue what I was doing).

 

I had ran a handful of 10k runs and one half marathon for charity and then a couple of years ago I decided to run 100 miles' worth of events as a fundraiser.  The D33, Edinburgh Marathon, Petrofac Challenge and Loch Ness Marathon.  I was intending to train properly for them but never really got round to it.  The D33 was abysmal - the toughest single physical effort I have ever endured and probably ever will.  7 hours 20ish (I forget the official time) on my feet for that one.  Trudging through the second half was horrible.  Edinburgh Marathon was marginally better though not much and then the Loch Ness Marathon was much better than both but I still hadn't really trained for it - finished that in 4:24 which I was chuffed with in the end.

 

Towards the end of 2012 (just after the marathons etc.) with my wife due to give birth in December, I decided to ditch all other hobbies in favour of giving running a serious go.

 

Garioch 10k, Mull of Kintyre Half Marathon and Loch Ness Marathon 2013 were the new targets, aiming for sub 45 10k, sub 1:45 HM and sub 4 hour marathon.  The marathon never happened as I landed up being best man at my mate's wedding on the same day.

 

Training went very well though and I came in at 42:52 at Garioch 2013, and following a couple of injury scares, came in at 97:33 at the Mull of Kintyre HM, then a couple of weeks later PBd at the Fraserburgh 10k in 42:01.  About 6 weeks later and after poor training in between (due to the bloody heat of last summer as much as anything) I ran in the National Lottery Anniversary 5 miles in London (finishing up in the Olympic Stadium).  PB was always going to happen as I hadn't raced 5 miles before - came in in 34:19, which was a bit slower than I'd hoped for but it was hot, twisty, and very busy, so a decent time in the end.  I was only 2 minutes behind Paula Radcliffe and I beat Sporty Spice and Victoria Pendleton!  Chuffed with that!

 

I also ran the BRG Coastal Challenge from Fraserburgh to Gardenstown in August 2013, having used it as a training / practice run for Loch Ness Marathon 2012 - it's a 17.5 mile hilly beast.  Knocked 13 minutes off my previous year's time, coming in in 2:27 - a tad disappointed as I was hoping for sub 2:20, but my legs gave up after the bastard of a hill at about 14 miles, and I just had to plod home from there (instead of sprinting the last 3 miles as I'd hoped I'd do as it's pretty much downhill from there!).

 

So, that was then, now I'm back training for the Garioch 10k - target for 2014 is to run sub 40 min for the 10k and sub 1:35 for the HM (but aiming for closer to 90 minutes, possibly even slip below that if the training goes very well).

 

So far the training hasn't gone to plan due to illness, and being hoorin' busy at work but got back to it this week with a couple of decent workouts, but I've been hit with the fucking cold again, so not sure if I'll manage the planned 10 mile run tomorrow.

 

I'm following the 3 + 2 "Run Less, Run Faster" plan as I did last year - it's based on 3 "hard" workouts per week, supplemented by a couple of cross-training sessions.  I'm not very good at doing the cross-training sessions, but normally get the 3 runs per week in (one interval session, one tempo session and one long run).  I try to do a decent strength workout once a week too, but so far this year, I've only managed one.

 

Anyway - that was long.  Anyone else care to share what they're doing / have done / etc?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ran a marathon last year (Moray, touch over 4hr45), and running another one this year (Loch Ness, aiming for sub 4hr30).

 

Was going to do the D33 but got ill over Christmas/New Year and don't have enough time to train properly for it. Really got into the habit of enjoying the long weekend runs last year (one of the benefits of living in Teuchter country), but didn't enjoy having legs that felt like I had lead shot running through my veins...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ran a marathon last year (Moray, touch over 4hr45), and running another one this year (Loch Ness, aiming for sub 4hr30).

 

Was going to do the D33 but got ill over Christmas/New Year and don't have enough time to train properly for it. Really got into the habit of enjoying the long weekend runs last year (one of the benefits of living in Teuchter country), but didn't enjoy having legs that felt like I had lead shot running through my veins...

Loch Ness is a cracking course.

 

Advice from me for that one would be to not go mental in the first 10 miles or so.  It's all downhill and feels like the easiest thing in the world.  I was aiming for sub 4, so about 9 minute miles.  To be fair, I was probably kidding myself a bit if I thought I could do that over 26.2 miles a year and a half ago, but that was the target.  I set out with my mate at the start and ran alongside him for a few miles at 8 minute miles.  Bad idea.  Despite it being downhill, it knackers your quads and you feel it in the second half of the race where it's mostly uphill.  I had to walk up the hills at about 17 and 21/22 miles, which killed any hope of sub 4.  Until about 16 miles I was probably still on for it.

 

Still enjoyed it though - it's a great atmosphere, and a great course!

 

EDIT:  How are you training / planning to train for it?  Do you just get the long run in at the weekend and "fill in" with 2 or 3 runs during the week or are you following a structured plan, aiming for x miles per week etc.?

 

Last year when I was going to to run the Loch Ness Marathon, I'd conjured up a training plan based on the Pfitzinger & Douglas "Advanced Marathoning" book.  I was actually quite relieved when my best mate asked me to be best man at his wedding because the training plan was pretty brutal.  Up to about 70 miles a week.  I had got hung up on aiming for a 3 hour (ish) marathon but no way was I ready for that last year, so I'm glad I didn't break myself trying.  Marathon plans are on hold for a couple of years I think.

Edited by Gladstone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I try to run when I can but I can't seem to get into a good routine. Before work seems to be the best time but because I have no real goals other than to just boost my stamina and get fitter it's hard to get motivated and I get lazy with it. I just whip out the runkeeper app and do a couple of miles when I can. It's a pretty crappy way to go about it because I'm not aiming to beat any times and I don't have anything i'm actually training for.

 

I looked into doing a half-marathon but all the spots got taken before I got the chance to even think about it. I have a shitty running style too. I'm just terrible basically.

 

Any tips on how to keep to a schedule (other than just having the motivation of course) are welcome

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I try to run when I can but I can't seem to get into a good routine. Before work seems to be the best time but because I have no real goals other than to just boost my stamina and get fitter it's hard to get motivated and I get lazy with it. I just whip out the runkeeper app and do a couple of miles when I can. It's a pretty crappy way to go about it because I'm not aiming to beat any times and I don't have anything i'm actually training for.

 

I looked into doing a half-marathon but all the spots got taken before I got the chance to even think about it. I have a shitty running style too. I'm just terrible basically.

 

Any tips on how to keep to a schedule (other than just having the motivation of course) are welcome

 

That's a lot how I used to be actually.

 

I'm not really sure what changed.  I read a lot of running material.  The thing that probably inspired me most was "Born to Run" - excellent book written about ultra marathon running and about a native American tribe who are basically the best ultra marathon runners ever.  I forget who wrote it, but a quick google / amazon search would find it.  It's a very inspiring read as is the book by Scott Jurek "Eat and Run" - he beat those American tribe ultra marathon runners - that's how good he was!

 

As well as that, the best piece of advice I got was to slow down.  I was going out attempting to run like 10 miles or even 20 miles sometimes as part of marathon training but simply going too fast and not being arsed to go much farther than about 4 miles.  It sounds really simple, but for some reason I just thought going out and running at the same speed all the time, would mean that I would be able to go that speed for a further distance.  I'm not explaining that very well, but to go out for a long run, it's really easy (comparatively speaking) to just go mega mega slow and keep going).  It's really rewarding mentally and physically each time you run a bit further.

 

So, it might be a good thing for you, if you're not entering any races/events, to give yourself a weekly target of x miles, or to go for a PB once a week of adding a little bit to your longest run.  So, if your current longest run is say 2 miles, try for 2.5 miles the following week, then 3, then 3.5 until you get to about 5 and stick with that for a few weeks (as well as adding in another 1 or 2 runs per week in between).  Then up it to 6 for a few weeks, then 7 for a few weeks etc etc.

 

You would be amazed at how soon you are capable of running about 10 miles without stopping.  The secret to doing something like the above is to be absolutely unconcerned with how long it takes you to do each run.  Slow and steady - doesn't even matter if you're not out of breath or anything like that.  In fact, that level of exercise (slow and steady where you're not even out of breath) is a really good intensity for fat burning, so could be really beneficial.

 

Just ideas!

 

Oh - and writing a target down to really affirm it can often help.  So if you write something like "be able to run 5 miles without stopping by the end of February" or whatever, then you've got something definite to aim for. 

 

EDIT:  Hardly anyone looks cool when they're running by the way.  It's a weird action!

Edited by Gladstone
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good advice.

 

I definitely need to slow down. That probably involved getting up much earlier because I normally just bomb it for the 30 or so mins I have. 

 

I think I will start making a few goals. Cheers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slowing down is great advice.  Especially for the long weekend runs.  Distance and enjoying it are more important.

 

I'm very much still a slow, but committed runner.  Started about 6 or 7 years ago just slogging very slowly round a mile or two route when I live in town then someone asked me to do the Baker Hughes 10k with them for charity.  Made it in under an hour (by seconds) and thought I was done with running.  Then I was doing a bit of martial arts and a bit of running was good cross training. After a couple of years I entered the Baker Hughes again and ran the Balmoral 10k and that was running firmly part of my life.  Picked up a bad knee injury doing Taekwondo and while laid off I decided I missed running more than getting kicked in the head.

 

Moved to Banchory decided to join Deeside Runners to meet some locals and ended up getting hooked into running properly.  Club is mostly full of hill runners with a few road runners.  I'm still one of the slower runners in the club but have made a lot of good friends and done races and runs I'd never have considered before.  I've run hill races, did the Stoney half in 2.05 and memorably ran up two munros in a single, exhausting "run" last autumn in Assynt. My 10k time is down to 50.34 (fucking headwind on the back straight at the Dyke 10k cost me a sub 50 time).  I even managed to win our club's summer race series (made up of 6 handicap races, a format that favours runners who improve over the season).

 

Been struggling to stick to my routine this winter due to work and weather but hopefully will get back into it properly as we get closer to spring.  Got a lot of high hopes for this year - planning to do a few half marathons and a lot of the local hill races.  Would love to get my half marathon under 2 hours and maybe even get a club achievement time.  I also have to get that 10k time under 50 mins.

 

My top tip?  Enjoy it. Absolutely work on speed but most of your miles are going to be long and slow. If you don't enjoy them you're not going to stick at it.  One of the reasons I like running in the hills is the scenery makes it a lot easier to enjoy the long runs.  Going out and back along the deeside way isn't nearly as good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn that fucking headwind!!! It's the second biggest cunt in running. The biggest one being injury.

Chris - surely that sub 50 has to happen this year. You entered into the Garioch 10k?

Possibly not PB material as there are a couple of hills - not proper hills but enough to slow you down a little. Fraserburgh 10k is pretty flat actually - maybe worth a go in June?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a cunt of a cold brewing Thursday afternoon and felt pretty shitty yesterday - aches and stiffness and all that shit that goes with it.

Woke up feeling infinitely better today.

My nose is still a bit stuffy but it's such a fine looking day - I really want head out for my 10 miler today.

Bad idea? Should probably give myself another day and go tomorrow... Hmmm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

EDIT:  How are you training / planning to train for it?  Do you just get the long run in at the weekend and "fill in" with 2 or 3 runs during the week or are you following a structured plan, aiming for x miles per week etc.?

 

Last year when I was going to to run the Loch Ness Marathon, I'd conjured up a training plan based on the Pfitzinger & Douglas "Advanced Marathoning" book.  I was actually quite relieved when my best mate asked me to be best man at his wedding because the training plan was pretty brutal.  Up to about 70 miles a week.  I had got hung up on aiming for a 3 hour (ish) marathon but no way was I ready for that last year, so I'm glad I didn't break myself trying.  Marathon plans are on hold for a couple of years I think.

 

Last year I did two shortish runs midweek, then the long 'un Saturday/Sunday, I roughly pilfered the plan from the Loch ness Marathon website. This year I'm planning on mixing it up a bit with some cycling thrown in. And like Chris, want to fire in a sub-2hr half marathon (though it probably won't happen at Stonehaven....)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My nose is still a bit stuffy but it's such a fine looking day - I really want head out for my 10 miler today.

Bad idea? Should probably give myself another day and go tomorrow... Hmmm

As long as your breathing is OK and you've no problems in your chest you're safe enough running.  Usual rules apply really, take it easy and listen to your body.  I usually find if I'm feeling a wee bit under the weather a run usually helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Took on the 10 miler today. Thought it was going to be shit as the first couple of miles were really tough, mainly due to the wind being a dick. Once I got into my stride though it was pretty good.

My training plan says 7:12 per mile on the 'long tempo' runs - decided not to sim for that on the first 10 miler of the year, especially off the back of the cold and missing the last 2 long runs of 8 and 9 miles.

Averaged 7:52 per mile which given all of the above and the cuntiness of the wind I'm quite chuffed with that. Hopefully I'm close to getting back on track with the plan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had another really lazy weekend and done nothing but drink beer. Which is nice but it's not doing me any good.

 

Need to get my finger out.  Will try and get out Monday, Wednesday and Thursday this week for a couple of 5k and 10k loops.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So - it seems I was preaching but not following my own advice...

 

I've managed to get in tow with a guy from a running forum who's one step away from being a qualified running coach and runs off something like 33 minute 10k.

 

Got some great advice from him and have changed up my training plan.  Slowed down the intervals and tempo runs a touch, slowed down the long runs a lot and added some easy runs in between.  I'm planning to now run 6 times a week, but only 2 of those will be at high intensity.

 

This week's been good so far - Tuesday, intervals session - 6 x 1km (slightly quicker than 10k PB pace), Wednesday good core strength workout and later a 20 minutes recovery run.  Today I'll be heading out for a "threshold" workout.  6 x 5 minutes at threshold pace.  Tomorrow a 30 minute recovery run then Saturday 10 miles at easy pace.  Should be a good week!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I even managed to win our club's summer race series (made up of 6 handicap races, a format that favours runners who improve over the season).

 

 

Chris - I glossed over this last time.  Great effort indeed!

 

The handicap series is a great idea for running clubs to provide everyone with a very good chance of winning a race or an entire series like you did!

 

I've never won anything at running.  I once came second in a one mile race at New Deer Show when I was 15.  No fucking clue what I was doing - just went out at nearly full pelt and was way ahead of everyone until about half way when this guy from Fraserburgh Running Club (who clearly knew what he was doing), ran me down and then finished almost a lap (of a 6 lap course) ahead of me.

 

He told me later that I had him worried because if I'd kept up that pace he would never have caught me and he invited me to join Fraserburgh Running Club.  It's one of my few "regrets" in life.  I played football for 3 teams at the time so didn't want to give any of that up.  I could have probably been a decent runner if I'd got some proper training / advice at that age and might even have been one of these guys running sub 35 10k or quicker by now...  (Maybe - fuck all to back that up with really...).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris - I glossed over this last time.  Great effort indeed!

 

The handicap series is a great idea for running clubs to provide everyone with a very good chance of winning a race or an entire series like you did!

 

Cheers!  It's great for those of us in the club who have the biggest room for improvement. I found it was great for giving me a summer long focus and making sure I was at least beating my own times every month for the 6 races.  Sadly injury meant I could only do two of the races last year so I couldn't defend the title but it was nice to have a trophy for a year (never won anything sporty before)!

 

Not sure if I'll try and win it this year. I'd like to get close to 20 mins on the course (it's a not quite 5k course out at Cambus O'May) and maybe win a single race outright (my series win was based on consistent high points finishes rather than race wins).

 

First I need to get the miles in the legs!  Did a 5k loop and a 7k this week.  Will try and get up early tomorrow and do a slow 8 miles as well then need to make sure I don't drop off again next week.  Seem to be having one good week then a week or two of being lazy right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah - great motivator.  I struggled with motivation over the summer last year due to not really having any targets later in the year.  I nearly joined Fraserburgh Running Club last year but to be honest, I would be struggling to benefit from it at the moment because evenings are pretty much a no-go.  Maybe later this year or next year I'll think about it again though.

 

Fraserburgh's handicap series is made up of 5 mile races.  My neighbour goes along sometimes - he's a 47-48 minute 10k runner and he's came right up there (maybe third in the races) sometimes.

 

They also do a cool "Runbuchan" thing in the summer where every second week they pick a different location round about the Buchan area for the club run - route picked by whichever member wants to pitch in basically.  And, they do a yearly Mormond Hill race which is just a couple of miles down the road from me.

 

I'd actually love to join their club, but it's just not feasible at the moment.

 

30 minutes recovery run for me today.  9:40ish per mile.  Felt very slow - I've never forced myself to go that slow over such a short distance before - cool though.  Discovered paths in Westhill that I didn't know existed!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

They also do a cool "Runbuchan" thing in the summer where every second week they pick a different location round about the Buchan area for the club run - route picked by whichever member wants to pitch in basically.  And, they do a yearly Mormond Hill race which is just a couple of miles down the road from me.

 

Yeah we do similar things to that on Thursday nights and Sundays (though I don't make it along often). Someone suggests a hill or trail and everyone meets up (with headtorches in winter) and runs it.

 

We're quite good at organising races too.  Most of the ones on Deeside are ours (Scolty race, Morven, Ballater 10, Loch Kinord 10k) plus we organise the Lairig Ghru race every year.  I'd hugely recommend joining a club but it's not for everyone.  Loads of folk see running as a solitary thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah we do similar things to that on Thursday nights and Sundays (though I don't make it along often). Someone suggests a hill or trail and everyone meets up (with headtorches in winter) and runs it.

 

We're quite good at organising races too.  Most of the ones on Deeside are ours (Scolty race, Morven, Ballater 10, Loch Kinord 10k) plus we organise the Lairig Ghru race every year.  I'd hugely recommend joining a club but it's not for everyone.  Loads of folk see running as a solitary thing.

I was just having a look through the Scottish Running Guide and spotted the Ballater 10 - not one I was aware of.  I'll be away down in Glasgow town that weekend though for the Commonwealth Games.

 

Otherwise I would have been up for that - I fancy a cheeky 10 mile race but there are hardly any at that distance in our neck of the woods.

 

Guaranteed PB (as I've never raced 10 miles before). :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm thinking about giving this running thing a go. Since I broke my arm and stopped playing football last March my fitness level has fallen down a hole and playing badminton twice a week can't cover it. I've done a couple of 5k loops that were mostly ok (taking about 28 minutes to do so) but I find maintaining that kind of pace without speeding up and knackering myself out half way round. I've also found that I can't run well with music on because I can't help but want to hit the beats because drummerlol. Going to try it again tomorrow with podcasts rather than tunes to see if that's any better.

Edited by Woodsinho
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm thinking about giving this running thing a go. Since I broke my arm and stopped playing football last March my fitness level has fallen down a hole and playing badminton twice a week can't cover it. I've done a couple of 5k loops that were mostly ok (taking about 28 minutes to do so) but I find maintaining that kind of pace without speeding up and knackering myself out half way round. I've also found that I can't run well with music on because I can't help but want to hit the beats because drummerlol. Going to try it again tomorrow with podcasts rather than tunes to see if that's any better.

Welcome to the world of running!

 

As above - SLOW DOWN is probably the best advice you'll hear.  Pretty good if you can knock out a 28 minute 5k already, but don't fall into the trap of trying to beat that all the time.  If you run a couple of times a week and try to run 5k as fast as you can all the time, that's the equivalent of someone racing 5k twice a week, which is not advisable!

 

Try going a bit slower and then build on the distance / time on your feet.  So, for example, try making your next target 30 minutes but slow down.  You might not even get to 5k in 30 minutes but that doesn't matter.  Then try to go for say 35 minutes, then 40.  I would stick at that for a while though until you get used to it.  But as said a million times, keep it nice and slow and enjoy it.

 

I went out for a "recovery" run today.  My target is to run a sub 40 minute 10k, which equates to 6:24 minutes per mile.  My average pace today was about 9:40 minutes per mile.  I'm gradually getting my head round the fact that I don't need to always try and go fast all the time!!  Tomorrow I'll be out on a 10 mile "easy" run - about 8:00 - 8:30 minutes per mile.  You get the idea - miles slower than my race pace!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've signed up for a 10k taking place at the end of April. My only of competitive running was in the 2012 Inverness 10k which I managed in managed 49 minutes or so. I'd be chuffed to bits if I could get sub-50 again.

 

I'm trying to stick to some sort of regular training schedule for it, but it's been hard to get out. 40+ degree days become the norm in Melbourne this time of year and it takes it all outta me to go just a few kilometres. Signed up to a gym recently to make use of the air-con. I've never felt all that comfortable on a treadmill but it's going well so far. Did 10ks in 69 minutes the other day whilst watching an episode of True Detective on the treadmill screen which was surprisingly easy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...