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Looking For A Case For An Acoustic


Guest Young Adolesent
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if your just looking for an acoustic to piss about on and not spend lots of money one, then you might want to pop into a sue rider charity shops.

 

they sell chantry acoustics, normal and cutaway for rought £40, not bad for a brand new one with a set of spare strings.

 

I had one and it lasted 4 years as a random chuckabout acoustic, it survived a download fest.

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Guest Young Adolesent

Yeh I went in once looking at their es 335 stlye guitars long story short my mate farted it all went quite and we ran out laughing, back on topic yeh its fine im looking for something for open tunning my guitar strings keep snapping they cant cope from standard then changing to open c and that

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Yeh I went in once looking at their es 335 stlye guitars long story short my mate farted it all went quite and we ran out laughing, back on topic yeh its fine im looking for something for open tunning my guitar strings keep snapping they cant cope from standard then changing to open c and that

I manage find are you winding them round the tuning pegs correctly

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Guest Young Adolesent

I manage find are you winding them round the tuning pegs correctly

the way i was tought was to have the whole facing down put the string through and hold and tighten it 

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the way i was tought was to have the whole facing down put the string through and hold and tighten it 

 

When you put the string through the hole on the tuning peg, pull it a bit tighter so that there is some tension on it. Then - the bit a lot of people disregard - pull the string slack from the nut towards the frets (by 1 fret of distance on the high E, 3 frets on the low E and the relative distance for the rest (imagine a diagonal line between the 2 points I mentioned across the board and pull back accordingly). This allows for an appropriate amount of string to be wound round the post, ensuring greater tuning stability and a bit of flexibility when re-adjusting tunings. 

 

(obviously the lengths provided are a guide, not a science :) )

 

Also, the string that has already passed the post must go over the top of the string in tension from the nut to the post. This applies the correct stress to the post itself and avoids the string overlapping and pinching on itself (reducing it's life and increasing the likelihood of slippage).

 

Finally, make sure to wind in the correct direction. If you are using a guitar with 6-a-side machine heads that are on the top (like a Strat/Tele) - wind anti-clockwise. For reversed headstocks (some Jacksons, ESPs etc.) you want to wind clockwise. When it comes to a Les Paul/335 etc. that has 3 pegs per side, the bass side pegs are wound anti-clockwise and the treble side clockwise. Doing this ensures that the string is pitched from the nut slot to the machine head at the correct angle, again giving the correct stress levels and enhancing the string life as it reduces the chance of it snapping at this point. 

 

However, regardless, there is something pretty important to keep in mind when continually altering tunings on a guitar. I posted about this factor on another forum when explaining that to accurately intonate a guitar you require new strings. It also applies to tuning amendments:

 

Mass per unit length is the key here. wink_new.gif

When you've been playing a set of strings, or one string in particular (just whatever!), they are constantly under levels of tension which vary each time you fret them and they are continuously stretching when you retune, or when you bend a note etc. Also, if you often fret at the same position, it can create indentations on the string as it pushes against the fret wire.

Whilst the strings are stretching in these multitudes of manners, the wear is uneven over the length of the string. Thus, the mass per unit lengthover the length of the string varies at many different points. Therefore, intonating the string at this time will be inaccurate over its length.

 

Of course, the issues you may be having could come down to the gauge of strings being used, the age of the strings when this occurs, the level of oxidation on the strings themselves from having been played (if you have quite acidic sweat the level of string degradation will be much greater in a shorter period of time), sharp points at the machine head/nut/bridge causing the string to 'nip', stringing technique of course as above. There are many factors to consider.

 

:up:

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Guest Young Adolesent

When you put the string through the hole on the tuning peg, pull it a bit tighter so that there is some tension on it. Then - the bit a lot of people disregard - pull the string slack from the nut towards the frets (by 1 fret of distance on the high E, 3 frets on the low E and the relative distance for the rest (imagine a diagonal line between the 2 points I mentioned across the board and pull back accordingly). This allows for an appropriate amount of string to be wound round the post, ensuring greater tuning stability and a bit of flexibility when re-adjusting tunings. 

 

(obviously the lengths provided are a guide, not a science :) )

 

Also, the string that has already passed the post must go over the top of the string in tension from the nut to the post. This applies the correct stress to the post itself and avoids the string overlapping and pinching on itself (reducing it's life and increasing the likelihood of slippage).

 

Finally, make sure to wind in the correct direction. If you are using a guitar with 6-a-side machine heads that are on the top (like a Strat/Tele) - wind anti-clockwise. For reversed headstocks (some Jacksons, ESPs etc.) you want to wind clockwise. When it comes to a Les Paul/335 etc. that has 3 pegs per side, the bass side pegs are wound anti-clockwise and the treble side clockwise. Doing this ensures that the string is pitched from the nut slot to the machine head at the correct angle, again giving the correct stress levels and enhancing the string life as it reduces the chance of it snapping at this point. 

 

However, regardless, there is something pretty important to keep in mind when continually altering tunings on a guitar. I posted about this factor on another forum when explaining that to accurately intonate a guitar you require new strings. It also applies to tuning amendments:

 

 

Of course, the issues you may be having could come down to the gauge of strings being used, the age of the strings when this occurs, the level of oxidation on the strings themselves from having been played (if you have quite acidic sweat the level of string degradation will be much greater in a shorter period of time), sharp points at the machine head/nut/bridge causing the string to 'nip', stringing technique of course as above. There are many factors to consider.

 

:up:

wow that was a load of reading, thanks helped a lot

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