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Nurse found dead after prank call to Kate Middleton's hospital.

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It seems that this prank call was the straw that broke the camels back. Those dj's surely can't be blamed 100% for that wifeys death.

With these things, nothing is ever 100% attributable. It's always a complex combination of events and emotions. The fact is, though, when you introduce yourself into someone's life, you start to become involved in those factors, either positively or negatively. While those DJs may have had no idea what they were getting into, their irresponsible behaviour did end up being the final straw as you said.

I feel I should have a more serious avatar given the nature of this discussion.

xx

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Suicide itself is an appropriate verb and can be used as such. I.e. The nurse suicided. It's not used that way very often and sounds fairly clunky and out of place, personally I opt for the term "died by suicide".

I've spoken with a lot of people who have been affected by suicide through my charity work and many many families of victims find the use of the verb "commit" offensive because it carries all the same connotations as if the deceased was a criminal.

xx

com·mit (kschwa.gif-mibreve.giftprime.gif)

v. com·mit·ted, com·mit·ting, com·mits

v.tr.

1. To do, perform, or perpetrate:

...

It just means to do something. Suicide is not a crime in Scotland.

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com·mit (kschwa.gif-mibreve.giftprime.gif)

v. com·mit·ted, com·mit·ting, com·mits

v.tr.

1. To do, perform, or perpetrate:

...

It just means to do something. Suicide is not a crime in Scotland.

It's also not painless. M*A*S*H lied.

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com·mit (kschwa.gif-mibreve.giftprime.gif)

v. com·mit·ted, com·mit·ting, com·mits

v.tr.

1. To do, perform, or perpetrate:

...

It just means to do something. Suicide is not a crime in Scotland.

Oh I know, you can commit a random act of kindness, for example. However the connotations of the word commit with respect to suicide are negative.

EDIT: Also, from google:

com·mit

/kəˈmit/

Verb

  1. Carry out or perpetrate (a mistake, crime, or immoral act): "he committed an uncharacteristic error".
  2. Pledge or bind (a person or an organization) to a certain course or policy.

Synonyms

perpetrate - consign - entrust

xx

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Oh I know, you can commit a random act of kindness, for example. However the connotations of the word commit with respect to suicide are negative.

xx

I do believe you, but I'm sorry - that sounds completely ridiculous to me.

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Just like the edited definition above, commit CAN mean to perform, but it's generally used as a synonym for perpetrate.

You don't commit brain surgery, for example.

It's a very minor thing but I do a huge amount of work trying to break down barriers and stigmas attached to mental health disorders and their effects. "Committing suicide" is a phrase which perpetuates an existing stigma.

I don't expect everyone to change the way they use language based on my objections, but I at least hope people will consider the connotations of the wording they use a little more closely. I LIKE WORDS.

WORDS.

xx

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They didn't but they may as fucking well have - a live phonecall to the ward where the future fucking queen was having her sprog looked at?

I was under the impression it was a recorded phonecall and had been screened by the radio's lawyers before airing?

Okay, say she hadn't killed herself, I don't get how the DJ's are dicks because of the chance of her losing her job, when she gave out information? From what I can see in the reports, she didn't transfer the call, she was the one who gave out personal details. Fuck that, if any nurse had done that to me, I'd want her bloody job regardless of how nice she is. What about Panorama, where people who don't do their jobs properly are exposed? Are they mean bastards?

It's horrific that this poor woman was in a dark place mentally, and felt her only option was to take her life. I feel really sorry for her family and friends, and I can only hope that this draws attention to mental health issues, with more help offered to NHS staff as a result. I understand that nurses do a difficult job, but there are regulations in place for a reason - to protect both parties.

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The nurse that died was the one who passed the phonecall through to Kate's nurse.

EDIT: @ Slutbags.

Ok, so the news reports are misleading - the majority I have read explained she had unwittingly passed on information. The phonecall shouldn't have been transferred, again not the DJ's fault.

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Ok, so the news reports are misleading - the majority I have read explained she had unwittingly passed on information. The phonecall shouldn't have been transferred, again not the DJ's fault.

Well, I'm going by what was broadcast on the day of the news breaking, unless they have found out it was her that gave out the info.

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Oh I know, you can commit a random act of kindness, for example. However the connotations of the word commit with respect to suicide are negative.

EDIT: Also, from google:

com·mit

/kəˈmit/

Verb

  1. Carry out or perpetrate (a mistake, crime, or immoral act): "he committed an uncharacteristic error".
  2. Pledge or bind (a person or an organization) to a certain course or policy.

Synonyms

perpetrate - consign - entrust

xx

Also from Google:

per·pe·trate

/ˈpərpəˌtrāt/

Verb

Carry out or commit (a harmful, illegal, or immoral action).

Synonyms

commit - perform - make

"A harmful, illegal or immoral action" - Harmful? Yes. Illegal? Not in Scotland. Immoral? Dependent on where your moral compass lies, obviously, but if your standard of morality is Christianity, as an example, then yes it is.

Might I be as bold as to say (without a working knowledge of those who have taken their own lives or the families and loved ones they leave behind), that the idea that "committing suicide" is an offensive phrase is perpetrated amongst those who have suffered that kind of loss - rather, the idea of someone using that as a description is worse than what the words actually mean in real terms?

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I was under the impression it was a recorded phonecall and had been screened by the radio's lawyers before airing?

I thought differently but it's entirely possible I was misinformed. I stand by my point that finding out who she is wouldn't be difficult.

Okay, say she hadn't killed herself, I don't get how the DJ's are dicks because of the chance of her losing her job, when she gave out information? From what I can see in the reports, she didn't transfer the call, she was the one who gave out personal details. Fuck that, if any nurse had done that to me, I'd want her bloody job regardless of how nice she is.

I completely get what you're saying here - she fucked up in a big way and there's no point in trying to excuse her actions.

Say I got an email from a "nigerian prince" asking me to send him my bank account details, pin number, mother's maiden name and a small advance loan so that he can transfer my late great uncle's fortune to me, and I send him all the information - it means I did a stupid fucking thing but it doesn't make the guy sending the emails any less of a fraudulent cunt.

Yes, it's the nurses fault she gave out the info but the DJ is a dick for putting her in that position.

What about Panorama, where people who don't do their jobs properly are exposed? Are they mean bastards?

No, but if Panorama called a hospital and pretended to be a family member in order to retrieve information illegally, (I'm reasonably sure) that'd be entrapment. THEN they'd be mean bastards.

It's horrific that this poor woman was in a dark place mentally, and felt her only option was to take her life. I feel really sorry for her family and friends, and I can only hope that this draws attention to mental health issues, with more help offered to NHS staff as a result. I understand that nurses do a difficult job, but there are regulations in place for a reason - to protect both parties.

Yes. I agree 100% with this. Oh god it feels good to agree with someone.

xx

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Srsly?

No, not at all srsly.

Discussing mental health is making me come across as mental. Words.

Might I be as bold as to say (without a working knowledge of those who have taken their own lives or the families and loved ones they leave behind), that the idea that "committing suicide" is an offensive phrase is perpetrated amongst those who have suffered that kind of loss - rather, the idea of someone using that as a description is worse than what the words actually mean in real terms?

Y'know what, I'd actually pretty much completely agree with this. You could say something with the utmost sincerity and kindness in mind but the listener's interpretation could be the polar opposite to what you meant to convey.

I'm gonna go out on a limb here and assume that I'm contributing a little too much to this thread. I don't want to come off like a high-horsey dick head, but I'm well aware that I am and I apologise for getting all soap boxey about this. All I'm saying can be boiled down to that actions have consequences, you never know how fragile a person you're interacting with can be. I believe her fate is the result of the DJs actions (among other contributing factors, as I've said there's never a single, 100% CAUSE of someone's suicide).

I'm not trying to say that using the term "committed suicide" makes you a bad person, or anything of the sort. I simply want to make people aware that the wording can be a delicate issue, please bear it in mind if you happen to be talking to the recently bereaved.

I'd LOVE to say that I'm going to weigh out of this conversation now, it'd be for the best, but I know fine well that I won't.

xx

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Dont be daft, your speaking about a subject you feel strongly about, post away!

Just because myself and others dont agree with all your points, doesnt mean we dont welcome you making them :)

Words stroppy, they make the world go round.

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Dont be daft, your speaking about a subject you feel strongly about, post away!

Just because myself and others dont agree with all your points, doesnt mean we dont welcome you making them :)

Words stroppy, they make the world go round.

Case in point.

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My point of view is, yes they were dickish, and the call shouldn't have been put through. I don't blame them for what happened, but I understand that they certainly didn't help the poor woman's situation.

I'd be more inclined to point the finger at the press - after all, the first person who slags off the "fat kid" isn't always the one responsible for that person's upset, it's sometimes the people who take it further or keep at it that make things worse.

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So, let's try to make some room here for other folks' opinions.

D'you think the DJ should hang his head in shame? Was an apology enough or should he be brought off the air? Shouldn't he give a fuck because it's not his fault or should he be tried for manslaughter?

Also - would y'all say his behaviour is "better" or "worse" than the Russell Brand / Andrew Sachs debacle?

xx

EDIT - what a fucking nerve Slutbags, offering your opinion before I give you permission to!

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I'd be more inclined to point the finger at the press - after all, the first person who slags off the "fat kid" isn't always the one responsible for that person's upset, it's sometimes the people who take it further or keep at it that make things worse.

At the risk of a minor derailment - I totally agree it's irresponsible of the press to release names etc in these situations. Had the nurse known that her identity would never be made public, things might be different. For this reason, it severely annoys me that the EE publish peoples' names and addresses on their website! It just seems horrendously irresponsible to the point where they seem to be promoting vigilantism.

xx

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