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good cymbals?

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what are a decent set?i would say i am intermediate at drums but i get really pissed off when playing crap cymbals,i have been looking on ebay but it seems there are only crazy priced ones or cheap ass crap ones i just want a nice sounding set for not stupid money

any help/direction would be appreciated

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Check out the Paiste PST3 and PST5 series. Very reasonably priced and very reasonable sounding. It saddens me that nowhere up here stocks anything other than Zildjian. The Zildjian ZXT and ZHT respectively are probably the closest you'll get to them but I don't rate any of Zildjian's non-pro lines to be honest

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Check out the Sabian Pro/AA lines or Zildjian A/A Customs. These are probably your best bet once you get beyond "entry level" cymbals but dont want to spend the earth.

Prices are still on the reasonably expensive side, but miles cheaper than the top of the range lines eg. Sabian HH, or Zildjian K/K Custom.

All that said, my experience is that people often crack cymbals cos they're smashing the edges and not playing on the bow of the cymbal. Playing cymbals with good technique is as effective a way of prolonging cymbal life as anything. Obviously good quality gear helps, but if your battering the edges of good quality cymbals, you'll crack them eventually too.

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Check out the Sabian Pro/AA lines or Zildjian A/A Customs. These are probably your best bet once you get beyond "entry level" cymbals but dont want to spend the earth.

Prices are still on the reasonably expensive side, but miles cheaper than the top of the range lines eg. Sabian HH, or Zildjian K/K Custom.

All that said, my experience is that people often crack cymbals cos they're smashing the edges and not playing on the bow of the cymbal. Playing cymbals with good technique is as effective a way of prolonging cymbal life as anything. Obviously good quality gear helps, but if your battering the edges of good quality cymbals, you'll crack them eventually too.

this is an interstning point man,i aint really noticed how i hit them,i have not cracked any cymbals tho,that being said,is there a "correct" way/height to have the cymbal stands etc to prevent incorrect hitting?

prob a stupid question and each to there own on how to set a kit but a few ppl have pointed out that having everythin low and flat is the best way and not high and angled!

like i say more or less new to drumming but looking for all the advice i can get before taking it to the stage and more than likely leading to a slating for not doing things the right way and me looking like an ass!!

cheers for the advice lads!!

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this is an interstning point man,i aint really noticed how i hit them,i have not cracked any cymbals tho,that being said,is there a "correct" way/height to have the cymbal stands etc to prevent incorrect hitting?

prob a stupid question and each to there own on how to set a kit but a few ppl have pointed out that having everythin low and flat is the best way and not high and angled!

like i say more or less new to drumming but looking for all the advice i can get before taking it to the stage and more than likely leading to a slating for not doing things the right way and me looking like an ass!!

cheers for the advice lads!!

Zildjian.com - en-US

The link pretty much sums up how to hit them. If you aim straight for the centre when you hit them then they're not going to last very long. Aim an inch or 2 off centre (more or less depending on the size of cymbal) and they'll last a lot longer as you're not pushing them where they can't go.

The flatter you can get them the better but you don't want them perfectly flat and really high so you would angle them more the higher you go. It's all down to personal preference really. I have mine reasonably low and almost flat. I used to have them really high and almost flat but it was too much like hard work :D

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this is an interstning point man,i aint really noticed how i hit them,i have not cracked any cymbals tho,that being said,is there a "correct" way/height to have the cymbal stands etc to prevent incorrect hitting?

prob a stupid question and each to there own on how to set a kit but a few ppl have pointed out that having everythin low and flat is the best way and not high and angled!

like i say more or less new to drumming but looking for all the advice i can get before taking it to the stage and more than likely leading to a slating for not doing things the right way and me looking like an ass!!

cheers for the advice lads!!

The reason that you should hang your cymbals low and flat, isn't to make sure that you hit the right part of the cymbal....it's about giving the cymbal the chance to ring out properly. If the cymbal is at a high angle, it can't "breathe" and will decay too quickly.

As for where to play on the cymbal, avoid striking the edges directly (also prevents shredding sticks).....play close to the edge with either the tip or the shoulder of the stick if you need more volume.

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nice one lads this is some good info,really appreciate it,i will have a look on net for some of the above mentioned cymbals and will have a re-think on set up of kit at next practice

top stuff lads:up:

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will have a re-think on set up of kit at next practice

It's always a good idea to mess around with your set up, not just the cymbals but toms as well. I like to switch between a 5 piece set up, and a 4 or even 3 piece for practices. It means you get used to playing out of your zone a bit and you're more likely to come up with some interesting patterns that you might not have thought of before. It's also good to get out of the habit of having to have things set up exactly 'your way'. Makes life a lot easier if you're using someone else's kit, and you can just sit down and play. Anything that cuts down changeover times is good... I once had to play a set at the Lemon Tree on a left handed kit when the headliners were a bit arsey and only let us play if we didn't move or add anything. That was interesting...

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It's always a good idea to mess around with your set up, not just the cymbals but toms as well. I like to switch between a 5 piece set up, and a 4 or even 3 piece for practices. It means you get used to playing out of your zone a bit and you're more likely to come up with some interesting patterns that you might not have thought of before. It's also good to get out of the habit of having to have things set up exactly 'your way'. Makes life a lot easier if you're using someone else's kit, and you can just sit down and play. Anything that cuts down changeover times is good... I once had to play a set at the Lemon Tree on a left handed kit when the headliners were a bit arsey and only let us play if we didn't move or add anything. That was interesting...

Bloody hell, that would have been a nightmare!

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sabian XS-20's are what i use, i bought them a couple years ago to replace my "solar by sabians" i got when i was a beginner. If your playing rocky sort of stuff they are perfect, but they are not so good if you want to play other styles, particularly jazz.

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i dont think i am good enough to play jazz just yet,only just started to take drums seriously but the only practice i get is band practice ha ha so not much time to play around,i was offered some "B8"s but i had a listen on youtube and they sounds bollocks and they look cheap and tacky and so i wont be touching them:puke:

i am still searchig ebay but not really a good time of year to be buying stuff:down:

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i dont think i am good enough to play jazz just yet,only just started to take drums seriously but the only practice i get is band practice ha ha so not much time to play around,i was offered some "B8"s but i had a listen on youtube and they sounds bollocks and they look cheap and tacky and so i wont be touching them:puke:

i am still searchig ebay but not really a good time of year to be buying stuff:down:

haha, well it would probly be best to try different cymbals out in a shop, and then see if you can get them cheaper off the net, it can be dodgy buying cymbals on ebay sometimes, heard some horror stories.

wait till after christmas as well for when people have no money

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I'd vouch for Paiste PST5's: I had a set and they were just fine (until they got nicked, bad chat).

Mid level Sabian/Zildjian/Istanbul are all perfectly fine though.

:up:

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yes. end of.

ill third that, get A customs they sound the best by far i feel. Prob the most versitile cymbol as well. I use the mastersound range and they are amazing, maybe a little thin if your a hard hitter but if you learn properly you will have no problems, i batter the drum kit and so far ive only cracked one and that was through being stupid.

Listen to hugh he knows what he is talking about.

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ill third that, get A customs they sound the best by far i feel. Prob the most versitile cymbol as well. I use the mastersound range and they are amazing, maybe a little thin if your a hard hitter but if you learn properly you will have no problems, i batter the drum kit and so far ive only cracked one and that was through being stupid.

Listen to hugh he knows what he is talking about.

I've had 16" and 18" A-custom thin crashes for over 4 years, have given them muchos abuse, and the things still dont have the slightest ding on them. Greatest crash cymbals ever....and as you say, versatile as fuck.

Sold Tam o'Shantie a 20" A-custom medium ride a year ago or so.....gutted I sold it to be honest. Quality cymbal. Got a K-Custom ride now though... 8-)

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i like the sound of these a-customs lads but i am a hard hitter and not 100% sure on the hitting position of a cymbal so do you think i should get some cheapo's to batter until i learn the nessacary skills to play quality cymbals?

tho i have been watching alot of drum vids on youtube(only teaching i'm getting just now) and i can roughly see where to hit,tho there appears to be no 2 drummers the same!haha

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I've had 16" and 18" A-custom thin crashes for over 4 years, have given them muchos abuse, and the things still dont have the slightest ding on them. Greatest crash cymbals ever....and as you say, versatile as fuck.

Sold Tam o'Shantie a 20" A-custom medium ride a year ago or so.....gutted I sold it to be honest. Quality cymbal. Got a K-Custom ride now though... 8-)

i used to have one of those, it was amazing but i moved onto the 20" A custom Projection, it has a more cutting bell and you can open it up beautifuly without having to destroy it. I have the 16" and 18" Projection crashes and i also use a sabian vault 17" which i must say is one of the best crashes ive ever heard, mike (R.I.P) from prosound let me try it out when he got one from the factory before it went on sale and i bought it off him there and then. I use the 13" mastersound hats as well, again amazing, the K's were always just outside my price range although now i have more expendable cash i think i may look at the rides cause they rock. Im also liking the sound of some of the new Rezo range they have out.

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i like the sound of these a-customs lads but i am a hard hitter and not 100% sure on the hitting position of a cymbal so do you think i should get some cheapo's to batter until i learn the nessacary skills to play quality cymbals?

tho i have been watching alot of drum vids on youtube(only teaching i'm getting just now) and i can roughly see where to hit,tho there appears to be no 2 drummers the same!haha

remember battering cymbols wont make them louder or sound better, learn how to hit them then learn how to use a bit more oomph. some of the best drummers in the world hit very lightly but they know how to hit. I only wish i listened to this advice more often lol i know its easy to get carried away with the moment.

But yeah save up and get some A customs even the A Zildjians are ok and a bit cheaper. If you buy cheap cymbols they will sound cheap simple as, ive not really come across a cheap range that sounds decent.

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Guest treader.

I have an A custom Ping ride and a A Custom ride which I use as crashes on my setup and they sound fucking ace. I couldnt even recommend anything else.

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I am not a real drummer (I did Grade 1 and ocasionally mess around on my sister's kit) but most of the drummers I know seem to be awfully good at breaking Zildjian cymbals. They all play mid/lower range Zildjian and I suspect their higher end stuff is better. I think they sound ok-ish but in my view most would be better getting a minimal set to practice with (costing less than the Zildjian stuff) until they can afford to splash out on the higher end stuff.

I bought a set of cymbals from thomann for about 80 a few years a go which a drummer I work with thinks sound better than most of his Zildjian cymbals. It is not great but they are not easy to break and I have even used them on some recordings.

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I am not a real drummer (I did Grade 1 and ocasionally mess around on my sister's kit) but most of the drummers I know seem to be awfully good at breaking Zildjian cymbals. They all play mid/lower range Zildjian and I suspect their higher end stuff is better. I think they sound ok-ish but in my view most would be better getting a minimal set to practice with (costing less than the Zildjian stuff) until they can afford to splash out on the higher end stuff.

I bought a set of cymbals from thomann for about 80 a few years a go which a drummer I work with thinks sound better than most of his Zildjian cymbals. It is not great but they are not easy to break and I have even used them on some recordings.

ignore most of that, learn how to play properly and you wont break a cymbol unless its an accident.

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ha ha,every drummer has a different opinion/idea!

are splash cymbals any good? couple cheap ones on ebay,one is a sabian xs 10" and the other is a paiste PST5 8"?

i'm sure they are not amazing as they are only 20 quidish but i was just wondering if they are half decent sounding to annihilate?

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ha ha,every drummer has a different opinion/idea!

are splash cymbals any good? couple cheap ones on ebay,one is a sabian xs 10" and the other is a paiste PST5 8"?

i'm sure they are not amazing as they are only 20 quidish but i was just wondering if they are half decent sounding to annihilate?

its a very specific sound do you really think you would use it?

ive bought two over the years but ive never really used them that much, although ive never really experimented as much as i could have.

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