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multitrackers


Huw
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I've got one of these multitrack type recorder thingies on its way in the post (Boss BR600). I wouldn't normally get it, but it was all i could exchange the guys at soundie for my amp...

anyway... if i wanted to record 'real' drums what would be the best way to go about it. the unit has 2 mic inputs and a built in mic which is (apparently) quite good. so would it be best to have the 2 external mics just overhead and the unit in front of the drums or have one external on the kick and the other on the snare with the unit in front/overhead?

also, say i recorded each drum separately... i.e. first take - 2 overheads, second take - kick and snare, third take - toms etc. that would take up the best part of my 8 tracks. is it possible to move all this onto just the one track when i've finished mixing the individual drums?

that last point is probably a bit of a stretch for my skills and the capabilities of a 200 quid unit, but worth an ask nonetheless.

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Good luck doing the drums seperately! :up: I'd invest in a small mixer and mic up to 2 tracks (left and right)...a kick and snare mic and two large capsule condensors overhead, that'll pick up the toms aswell...

Failing that, get 2 decent mics, get the kit sounding decent, and play around with mic placement to get a real drum sound...a lot of recordings in the 60s probably had one mic on the drums!! Slam a compressor on a single mic and a bit of eq and you will have a deadly drum sound, you could overdub some single hits of the snare to their own tracks to tighten up the beat when everything else gets louds (ie. choruses, or the middle 8)

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Yeah, you're going to need an outboard mixer if you want to try and do anything sophisticated. Triangular miking the drums and mixing it down to two tracks will leave you 6 open to play with. Not knowing what recorder you've got, can you take more than 2 mic in's at a time?

What you may want to do is google some of the old Beatles 'how to's', because most of the early stuff was done with a 4-track by bouncing stereo mixes along with the next layer. So, if you're creative you can actually get more than 8 tracks of audio into a recording. The bad news is that once you commit to a take, well, there's no undo button. Still, that's a great way to learn and opens up some possibilities.

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cheers for all the help. i kinda had a rough idea but that clears things up a bit... so say i got this 4 input mixer could that then all be recorded onto one track on the unit?

its a Boss BR600.

Yeah, from what i hear the best way is to go with two external mics then just play round with the position til they sound good... any hints or recommendations?

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Can't help with mic placement for drums ( being ignorant, I'd probably have one low at the front, and 2 overheads). Unless each track is stereo on the Boss, you'd probably be best to use 2 tracks......if you want, you could lay a simple drum track onto those, but add percussion onto 4 more tracks, then 'bounce' the lot onto the remaining 2 tracks, leaving you six free again (and, if you're happy bouncing mixes, you can get loads of stuff on).

Like sonhenry said...you can't alter the levels of each bounce mix once you've done it.

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' date=' post: 458024"']cheers for all the help. i kinda had a rough idea but that clears things up a bit... so say i got this 4 input mixer could that then all be recorded onto one track on the unit?

if your recording 4 mics through the mixer and into your multi track, the levels will all have to be spot on first and you won't be able to pan things seperately once their recorded. not ideal but better than spontaneously combusting footwear.

if recording a drum kit for instance, you could have 2 overheads panned hard left and right and the kick and snare in the centre then out the mixer and into some line channels of your Boss (if it has them) and a guitar and bass going into the mic ins. I haven't looked at the boss thing and have just woke up so someone stop me if I am spraffin toyke

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Recording

Hi

That Boss unit is pretty good, you can bounce the tracks you've recorded down onto one track and as its digital the hiss should not build up.

However I think you will find that its a lot of hassle for what is a tool for quickly knocking up ideas/demos... its not the most user friendly device as its user interface is very basic. You'd be better off investing in some PC recording gear. Like CUBASE, Garage Band etc

The built in drums on the Boss are not too bad ... try that first.

You can also upload your recordings into a PC sequencer and mess around with it then.

First thing to do is read the manual! RTFM ... 2nd thing get a bigger memory card!

Good luck!

Stuart

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