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50 Worst Songs Ever


Bigsby
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Aye, some beauts....bit harsh on Spin Doctors I thought.

I would like to have seen 5's whole back catalogue in there though.

I think it's an American site so there's probably a whole bunch of garbage from the UK that didn't make a ripple in the US that would qualify. Everything ever recorded by 911 for example, or by Peter Andre. Most of Ronan Keating's work, especially Life Is A Rollercoaster. The Ketchup Song by Las Ketchup. Chesney Hawkes. Jason Donovan's weird plinky version of "Any Dream Will Do". Pretty much everything ever recorded by Texas. Including but not limited to Summer Sun and Say What You Want. Or that one when they got a rapper to do a verse so they would look cool but it was shit. Oh, and that bastard of a song "Perfect Ten" by The Beautiful South. I fucking hate that song. And that band. Most of Atomic Kitten's work. It was so boring. I know they were just a run of the mill girl band, but they manage to be even duller and less imaginitave than most girl bands. At least the Sugababes are reasonably inventive from time to time.

I could go on.

Oh also "I Just Called To Say I Love You" by Stevie Wonder should have been on the list. Prime example of a once great musician turning to radio friendly mediocrity.

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Here's a few more since I'm on a rant now: Blazing Squad, little chav cunts. Michelle McManus "All This Time" - the girl couldn't even sing, she just won Pop Idol because A) She was fat and people felt sorry for her and B) Scottish people will always back a fellow Scot even if she is fat and totally shit. Gareth Gates and Will Young's cover of "The Long And Winding Road" with loads of fist clenching, "baaaayyyyy-beh"'s and vocal gymnastics. All Saints cover of Under The Bridge was dire. In fact most of the generic, disposable boy bands from the 90s who's songs were so instantly forgettable that I can't even remember the names of most of them now. Uhm... Another Level? A1? Code Red? Five? 911?

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Brother Elwood - you're a man after my own heart!

I'm glad you mentioned "Life Is Rollercoaster" - I fucking hate that dirge.

We had an end of season night out about the time in the charts and I remember my teammates and an SPL Ref, Ian Emslie, standing in O'Donohughes belting it out like it was an anthem.

I was close to going Postal and glassing the fucking lot of them.

Men singing a wee schoolgirl heartthrob's song!!!

Fucking disgraceful.

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I heard a song on the radio the other day which sampled David Bowie's Let's Dance.

It was probably the most out of place sample I'd ever heard. Apart from the sample the song was inane Maroon 5 style sap rock, which I would have thankfully forgotten existed by now.

But the profiteering bastard that made it will probably have a hit almost solely on the basis of the Bowie sample. For that reason I'd put that tune (and I'm glad I don't know what it is called or who it is by) very high up in a worst 50 list.

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I heard a song on the radio the other day which sampled David Bowie's Let's Dance.

It was probably the most out of place sample I'd ever heard. Apart from the sample the song was inane Maroon 5 style sap rock, which I would have thankfully forgotten existed by now.

But the profiteering bastard that made it will probably have a hit almost solely on the basis of the Bowie sample. For that reason I'd put that tune (and I'm glad I don't know what it is called or who it is by) very high up in a worst 50 list.

It's Craig David according to Wikipedia.

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Id Do Anything for Love (But I Wont Do That) by Meat Loaf- a Bonnie Tyler favourite and the epitomy of what was good about the eighties, and I disagree with it's positioning entirely.

I agree that the "Sounds of Silence" by Simon and Garfunkel is wonderful as well, in fact most of their material is, apart from post duo material. But that's only on Art Garfunkel's part since he was never a very good songwriter.

"The End" by the Doors I also quite like. But it might be for the context in Apocalypse Now.

"Superman" by Five for Fighting is wonderful and I have no idea why they handpicked that when there are ample opportunities for slating other artists.

"Ebony and Ivory" I <i>completely</i> understand, because there is nothing worse than anyone recanting those lyrics.

I disagree mostly with the list, although I'm glad they didn't do the usual Britney Spears, Hanson thing because that's just dumb and those musicians are actually quite competent. I just think making lists is a very bad idea.

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I guess fairly American in focus and more on modern things, which probably explains why Peter Sarstedt's 'Where do you go to my lovely' isn't on there. Because it's without doubt the worst song ever written. 4 Non-blondes and Billy Joel's 'We didn't start the fire' are also pretty terrible, so at least they got them.

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Id Do Anything for Love (But I Wont Do That) by Meat Loaf- a Bonnie Tyler favourite and the epitomy of what was good about the eighties, and I disagree with it's positioning entirely.

WHAT? Are you sure you didn't do a typo here. It's surely the epitome of what was BAD about the eighties...and it was released in the 90s.:gringo:

"The End" by the Doors I also quite like. But it might be for the context in Apocalypse Now.

Good for the few moments in that context but why would anyone want nearly 8 minutes. Doors/Morrison don't do it for me.

This list is indeed froman American standpoint but does nail a lot of rank vomit inducing records:

BILLY RAY CYRUS Achy Breaky Heart

HUEY LEWIS AND THE NEWS The Heart Of Rock & Roll

THE BEACH BOYS Kokomo

BETTE MIDLER From a Distance

4 NON BLONDES Whats Up?

CHICAGO Youre the Inspiration

MR. MISTER Broken Wings

EUROPE The Final Countdown

REDNEX Cotton Eye Joe

The number one reminds me of when I first heard the thing that is Starship's We Built This City. Entertainment USA on BBC2 with pervo King and my first reaction was that this would never be a success in Britain as it was everything that was bad in music...pompous, paint by numbers good old USA bombastic AOR...and it became No1 within weeks. That's when I knew public taste could never be trusted and the charts were a sham...oh and that Jonathon King was Satan!

As for Ob la di Ob la da...I don't mind that at all. There are many other bands with worse music than that. o_O

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As for Ob la di Ob la da...I don't mind that at all. There are many other bands with worse music than that. o_O

I'm not a big fan of Ob La Di Ob La Da - not just cos I think it's a bit of a silly song, but it really just doesn't sit right on the White Album. That's a very experimental, and also very rock album, and halfway through side one you've got this silly little children's song....

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Hmm, can't say I go along with that, there's loads of different styles on the White Album. And stuff like Rocky Racoon and Piggies is quite silly as well if you think about it.

I agree, it's very diverse and it works well like that ...The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill is every much a nonsense kids song. The songs I really don't like on there are Don't Pass Me By, Goodnight and Revolution No.9 (though I respect it's inclusion of such a challenging track and glad they did it).

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And not forgetting...

Back In The U.S.S.R.

I Will

Julia

Yer Blues

Mother Nature's Son

Everybody's Got Something To Hide Except Me & My Monkey

Sexy Sadie

Long Long Long

Revolution 1

Back to shite songs

Queen - Radio Ga Ga

Cliff Richard - Mistletoe And Wine / Millennium Prayer

Kate Melua - 9m Bicycles / The Closest Thing to Crazy

Bryan Adams - The Only Thing That Looks Good on Me Is You

Bonnie Tyler - Holding Out For A Hero

And then the ghastly "novelty records"

The Tweets - The Birdie Song

Black Lace - Agadoo

Mr Blobby - Mr Blobby

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To be fair to her, she admitted, when challenged that some of the facts in that song were incorrect and recorded an alternative version:

On September 30, 2005, an article appeared in The Guardian newspaper in which physicist Simon Singh criticised the song's lyrics. Singh said that with the song Melua "demonstrates a deep ignorance of cosmology and no understanding of the scientific method", and objected to its second verse, where the song's protagonist "[contrasts] such guesswork with her own confidence in her blossoming long-term love":[3]

We are 12 billion light-years from the edge,

That's a guess — no-one can ever say it's true,

But I know that I will always be with you

Singh interpreted the first lyric as a statement that the observable universe was twelve billion years old, which he said was incorrect; according to "the very latest data", the universe was actually 13.7 billion years old. He added, "the next line in the song is unforgivable. To say that the age of the universe is "a guess" is an insult to a century of astronomical progress. The age of the universe is not just "a guess", but rather it is a carefully measured number that is now known to a high degree of accuracy". He wrote replacement lyrics which he believed would, if used, remedy his concerns:[3]

We are 13.7 billion light-years from the edge of the observable universe,

that's a good estimate with well-defined error bars,

Scientists say it's true, but acknowledge that it may be refined,

and with the available information, I predict that I will always be with you

Singh's statements received moderate coverage in the media, and led Batt to submit a response to The Guardian in which he defended his right to poetic license.[4] Melua agreed to re-record the song's second verse with Singh's proposed lyrics, though she said she encountered difficulty fitting in all of the syllables.[5] The revised version, which omitted the line "Scientists say it's true, but acknowledge that it may be refined", premiered on the radio show The Today Programme on October 15.[6] Melua said that she felt embarrassed by the error in the song, particularly given that she had been a member of her school's astronomy club. Singh himself later said he intended his article to be "to some extent ... tongue-in-cheek", but that he also wanted to defend principles in cosmology "that are on much firmer ground". He added that he believed his response to the song's lyrics had helped introduce cosmology to a wider audience, and said that "the writing of the original article was probably the most productive hour of my career".[4]

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