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The Ghost Of Fudge

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so. i just found an old email while clearing out one of my email accounts.

here it is, just because... i'd dispute some of these facts, but it's not like i'm going to go to the bother of checking them...

water polo. i don't believe that one anyway...

RANDOM EMAIL:

The self-sealing envelope was invented in Aberdeen.

There are over 30 towns named Aberdeen throughout the world. Many are in

the United States, including the states of Washington, Maryland,

Mississippi, and South Dakota.

The average annual rainfall for Aberdeen is 24 inches. In Edinburgh, the

average is 26 inches and in Glasgow it is 46 inches.

Aberdeen has won the Britain in Bloom contest a record 10 times.

Rubislaw Quarry in Aberdeen, from which much of the city's granite building

material comes, is one of the largest man-made holes in Europe. It is some

400ft deep but currently full of water.

Aberdeen is home to Scotland's largest permanent funfair.

Waterloo Bridge in London and the terrace of the Houses of Parliament are

constructed of Aberdeen granite. Over 640,000 cubic feet of Aberdeen

granite were used in the construction of the Forth Rail Bridge.

Union Bridge in the centre of Aberdeen is still the largest single-span

stone bridge in the world.

Aberdeen has the busiest civil helicopter airport in the world.

The Aberdeen Press and Journal is Britain's oldest daily newspaper and the

world's third-oldest English-language newspaper. It can trace its roots to

1746 when the town printer, James Chalmers, wrote an eyewitness account of

the Battle of Culloden.

The fastest ever sailing ship, the Thermopylae, was built in Aberdeen in

1868.

The first iron lung was designed in Aberdeen in 1933, by Robert Henderson.

Union Street, Aberdeen's main street, was built over a period of five years

in the early the 1800s. At the time, this was one of the biggest

construction jobs in Europe and virtually bankrupted the city.

Aberdeen's Rowett Research Institute has produced three Nobel laureates.

Europe's highest concentration of life scientists is concentrated around

Aberdeen.

The astronomer Sir David Gill (1843-1914), who took the first photograph of

the moon, in 1868, was born in Aberdeen.

Water polo was invented on the River Dee in 1863.

to all of which the only answer is..... Jings

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if only we still did the fudge quiz, that would've beena godsend.

on the other hand, perhaps we did use those as questions, but were too drunk to remember.

anyway, according to onlynik, it was William Wilson who invented Water Polo, first played in the River Dee c.1875

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I saw that last week on the councils website. I assume if the City Council are posting it on their website, it's all been checked out and is accurate. Which is cool.

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Supposedly the first magician to pull a rabbit out of a hat, and catch a bullet between his teeth was from Aberdeen (John Anderson, the Wizard of the North....he's buried in St Nicholas graveyard, near the arch to the upper floor of the St Nicholas Centre).

Also...wasn't it just a couple of years ago that a fossil found at Stonehaven proved that the first creature to crawl from the sea and start breathing air was from there? As was the first pneumatic tyre....by somebody Thompson, I think (and the deep-fried mars bar....thanks to me and Mouse's family)

That guy who started the Japanese shipping industry, Thomas Blake Glove, was from Bridge of Don.

The first haggis to be successfully bred in captivity was from Methlick.

Because Lord Reith, the first chairman of the BBC was from Aberdeen, one of the first cities to get a radio station outside London was Aberdeen (it was in Belmont Street).

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Also...wasn't it just a couple of years ago that a fossil found at Stonehaven proved that the first creature to crawl from the sea and start breathing air was from there? As was the first pneumatic tyre....by somebody Thompson' date=' I think (and the deep-fried mars bar....thanks to me and Mouse's family)[/quote']

Correct. The oldest fossil was found at Cowie near Stonehaven and RW Thompson invented the pneumatic tyre 45 years before John Dunlop.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/beyond/factsheets/makhist/makhist10_prog10e.shtml

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Correct. The oldest fossil was found at Cowie near Stonehaven and RW Thompson invented the pneumatic tyre 45 years before John Dunlop.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/beyond/factsheets/makhist/makhist10_prog10e.shtml

He didn't patent it however, therefore John Dunlop is technically the inventor of the pneumatic tyre. I don't mean to go out my way to argue....it's just my useless knowledge kicking in!

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He didn't patent it however' date=' therefore John Dunlop is technically the inventor of the pneumatic tyre. I don't mean to go out my way to argue....it's just my useless knowledge kicking in![/quote']

from the link I posted:

What Dunlop did not realise was that 43 years earlier another Scot had patented almost the same thing. Robert Thomson, who had been to America, returned to Britain and was given a workshop by his father where he invented all sorts of things. In 1845 Thomson patented what he called aerial wheels

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Aberdeen is home to Scotland's largest permanent funfair.

Surely M&D at Strathclyde park has that title, although codona's is probably the oldest.

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Sticky toffee pudding was invented in Newburgh (Or so I've been told)

Aberdeen houses many deformed prostitutes in which allegedly sane members of the public pay their green to get a bonk on (Or so I've been told)

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What Dunlop did not realise was that 43 years earlier another Scot had patented almost the same thing. Robert Thomson' date=' who had been to America, returned to Britain and was given a workshop by his father where he invented all sorts of things. In 1845 Thomson patented what he called aerial wheels

[/quote']

....bummer

you win

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The first haggis to be successfully bred in captivity was from Methlick.

:laughing: Must be one of the few good things to come out of that tiny little blot on the Aberdeenshire countryside... must add that to the story to tell Americans...

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Apparently they tend to mope when not allowed to roam free, so the Methlick folks made decent sized runs for a captured pair. It didn't totally work though, so they had to 'encourage' the male to donate a wee drop in order to create a test tube haggisling.

(It was Graeme from Interesting Music who was brought in to 'fluff' the haggis...he's quite proud of it!)

(Bloody Malcolm Middleton!:swearing:)

;)

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